iloveyoulessthanpunk:

wenchymcwench:


We enter a little coffeehouse with a friend of mine and give our order. While we’re aproaching our table two people come in and they go to the counter: ‘Five coffees, please. Two of them for us and three suspended’ They pay for their order, take the two and leave.  I ask my friend: “What are those ‘suspended’ coffees?” My friend: “Wait for it and you will see.” Some more people enter. Two girls ask for one coffee each, pay and go. The next order was for seven coffees and it was made by three lawyers - three for them and four ‘suspended’. While I still wonder what’s the deal with those ‘suspended’ coffees I enjoy the sunny weather and the beautiful view towards the square infront of the café. Suddenly a man dressed in shabby clothes who looks like a beggar comes in throught the door and kindly asks ‘Do you have a suspended coffee ?’ It’s simple - people pay in advance for a coffee meant for someone who can not afford a warm bevarage. The tradition with the suspended coffees started in Naples, but it has spread all over the world and in some places you can order not only a suspended coffee, but also a sandwitch or a whole meal. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such cafés or even grocery stores in every town where the less fortunate will find hope and support ? If you own a business why don’t you offer it to your clients… I am sure many of them will like it.
 
Source : [x]

I just saw this and thought it would be incredible to share this so maybe it  could catch on wherever you may live 

Well now I’m crying, this is great.

iloveyoulessthanpunk:

wenchymcwench:

We enter a little coffeehouse with a friend of mine and give our order. While we’re aproaching our table two people come in and they go to the counter:
‘Five coffees, please. Two of them for us and three suspended’ They pay for their order, take the two and leave.

I ask my friend: “What are those ‘suspended’ coffees?”
My friend: “Wait for it and you will see.”

Some more people enter. Two girls ask for one coffee each, pay and go. The next order was for seven coffees and it was made by three lawyers - three for them and four ‘suspended’. While I still wonder what’s the deal with those ‘suspended’ coffees I enjoy the sunny weather and the beautiful view towards the square infront of the café. Suddenly a man dressed in shabby clothes who looks like a beggar comes in throught the door and kindly asks
‘Do you have a suspended coffee ?’

It’s simple - people pay in advance for a coffee meant for someone who can not afford a warm bevarage. The tradition with the suspended coffees started in Naples, but it has spread all over the world and in some places you can order not only a suspended coffee, but also a sandwitch or a whole meal.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such cafés or even grocery stores in every town where the less fortunate will find hope and support ? If you own a business why don’t you offer it to your clients… I am sure many of them will like it.

 

Source : [x]

I just saw this and thought it would be incredible to share this so maybe it  could catch on wherever you may live

Well now I’m crying, this is great.

(via liiightsout)

buttonundone:


Huell Howser, how is it that you can always make my day. I can always depend on your silly antics.

RIP Heull - I’m so glad I had a chance to meet you - and I still want your job……



Huell was California’s gold.

buttonundone:

Huell Howser, how is it that you can always make my day. I can always depend on your silly antics.

RIP Heull - I’m so glad I had a chance to meet you - and I still want your job……

Huell was California’s gold.

(Source: mattatattat, via geocycle2010)

jtotheizzoe:

A Map of Everyone
You can’t tell from where you’re sitting, but this map has 341,817,095 dots on it. Built with U.S. and Canadian census data, there’s a dot on here for everyone. 
Check out the zoomable version here. And when I say “zoomable”, I’m not kidding. Very cool.

Insane.

jtotheizzoe:

A Map of Everyone

You can’t tell from where you’re sitting, but this map has 341,817,095 dots on it. Built with U.S. and Canadian census data, there’s a dot on here for everyone. 

Check out the zoomable version here. And when I say “zoomable”, I’m not kidding. Very cool.

Insane.

On Geishas (or Geshas)
I suppose now is not only the season for cheer but for Geishas as well. There has been an awful lot of talk and releases of Geishas. Recently, Starbucks has released a Costa Rica Finca Palmilera Geisha selling for $40 per pound, Verve has released two Geshas; Panama Elida Green Tip Gesha, as well as, Finca Los Lajones Gesha, and CoffeeReview.com cupped a K-CUP Geisha that scored a 91! (yeah, you read that last line right)
With so much Geisha action, I felt I had to get in on it. Portola Coffee Lab had had the Natural processed Panama Don Pachi Geisha a short while back, and I thought that I had missed out. However, this past Friday they announced that  Jeff Duggan (owner of Portola) had bought the “Entire Lot” of Don Pachi. Last year, this Geisha auctioned off at $111/lbs. They Roasted the beans on Friday and were serving it at Theorem, and selling at 58g for $22 or 8oz for 60 ducks. Because I wouldn’t be able to make the Brew Bar Hours at Theorem I decided to buy a 58g container. Now some people might think that paying $22 for 56g of coffee is a little nuts (like my partner’s family, my family, and my friends). Multiply this by the fact that I’m broke and add the suggested usage of splitting 58g between two pour-overs. Then, you’ve probably calculated me as insane by now. However, you probably forgot to factor in that this coffee is also INSANE! so it pretty much cancels out my insanity.
"Even if I never brew this coffee"
It would be worth every penny. The dry aroma is off the charts. My ability to pick up on dry aroma has always been weak. Every now and again I’m able to really focus in on the dry aromas. However, with this Geisha it isn’t necessary. The dry aroma is so potent. Even my partner who usually abstains from caffeine (aside from the occasional, or rather, almost daily boba) was able to pick up on some scents. I was able to pick up Vanilla, Whiskey, Canned Pineapple, Brown Sugar, and Banana. 
My partner and her family were able to pick up on similar scents like Vanilla, Whiskey, Oak, and Chickory. She was quite impressed by the aroma as well. 
A few of my co-workers picked up on scents like Grape and Habanero.
"You’re talking to the foo that eats coffee beans"
Now in a method that is unorthodox (but revolutionary) my friend likes to eat coffee beans. Most people think he is nuts, I think he is a visionary. I dream of the day when we will look back and try to remember the days when we cupped without eating the beans first. Even in his ill state he was able to taste a brown liquor when he eat one bean.
"Knee Buckling"
Knowing that I do not have the proper equipment to do this coffee justice and wanting to share this experience I decided to take this coffee to work and share it with the head roaster and another co-worker. Wanting to spread out the coffee as much as possible we decide to forego the suggestion of splitting it into two pour-overs and we decided to brew 16 g with 8 oz of water in a Chemex. We tested this out on a Mexico 3rd place COE coffee. We liked the results and went forward with brewing the Geisha in the same way.
The notes of this coffee were amazing! At first you get a frontal assault of spice, a myriad of cinnamon, ginger and other warm spices. This assualt subsides and introduces you to a delicate body with jasmine and lilac notes, all the while, vanilla is playing softly in the background. As the cup begins to cool the spice turns to a brown sugar sweetness and brown butter savoriness and body. They mouth-feel is butter and the finish throughout the cup is makes you think that this coffee has been aged in a rich oak wood barrel. Or to put it in the words of a my co-worker “Knee buckling” 
If you have not had the pleasure of having this coffee run (don’t walk) to Portola to scoop some up. I also have plans to pick up one of Verve’s Geshas so be on the look out for that review!

On Geishas (or Geshas)


I suppose now is not only the season for cheer but for Geishas as well. There has been an awful lot of talk and releases of Geishas. Recently, Starbucks has released a Costa Rica Finca Palmilera Geisha selling for $40 per pound, Verve has released two Geshas; Panama Elida Green Tip Gesha, as well as, Finca Los Lajones Gesha, and CoffeeReview.com cupped a K-CUP Geisha that scored a 91! (yeah, you read that last line right)

With so much Geisha action, I felt I had to get in on it. Portola Coffee Lab had had the Natural processed Panama Don Pachi Geisha a short while back, and I thought that I had missed out. However, this past Friday they announced that  Jeff Duggan (owner of Portola) had bought the “Entire Lot” of Don Pachi. Last year, this Geisha auctioned off at $111/lbs. They Roasted the beans on Friday and were serving it at Theorem, and selling at 58g for $22 or 8oz for 60 ducks. Because I wouldn’t be able to make the Brew Bar Hours at Theorem I decided to buy a 58g container. Now some people might think that paying $22 for 56g of coffee is a little nuts (like my partner’s family, my family, and my friends). Multiply this by the fact that I’m broke and add the suggested usage of splitting 58g between two pour-overs. Then, you’ve probably calculated me as insane by now. However, you probably forgot to factor in that this coffee is also INSANE! so it pretty much cancels out my insanity.

"Even if I never brew this coffee"

It would be worth every penny. The dry aroma is off the charts. My ability to pick up on dry aroma has always been weak. Every now and again I’m able to really focus in on the dry aromas. However, with this Geisha it isn’t necessary. The dry aroma is so potent. Even my partner who usually abstains from caffeine (aside from the occasional, or rather, almost daily boba) was able to pick up on some scents. I was able to pick up Vanilla, Whiskey, Canned Pineapple, Brown Sugar, and Banana. 

My partner and her family were able to pick up on similar scents like Vanilla, Whiskey, Oak, and Chickory. She was quite impressed by the aroma as well. 

A few of my co-workers picked up on scents like Grape and Habanero.

"You’re talking to the foo that eats coffee beans"

Now in a method that is unorthodox (but revolutionary) my friend likes to eat coffee beans. Most people think he is nuts, I think he is a visionary. I dream of the day when we will look back and try to remember the days when we cupped without eating the beans first. Even in his ill state he was able to taste a brown liquor when he eat one bean.

"Knee Buckling"

Knowing that I do not have the proper equipment to do this coffee justice and wanting to share this experience I decided to take this coffee to work and share it with the head roaster and another co-worker. Wanting to spread out the coffee as much as possible we decide to forego the suggestion of splitting it into two pour-overs and we decided to brew 16 g with 8 oz of water in a Chemex. We tested this out on a Mexico 3rd place COE coffee. We liked the results and went forward with brewing the Geisha in the same way.

The notes of this coffee were amazing! At first you get a frontal assault of spice, a myriad of cinnamon, ginger and other warm spices. This assualt subsides and introduces you to a delicate body with jasmine and lilac notes, all the while, vanilla is playing softly in the background. As the cup begins to cool the spice turns to a brown sugar sweetness and brown butter savoriness and body. They mouth-feel is butter and the finish throughout the cup is makes you think that this coffee has been aged in a rich oak wood barrel. Or to put it in the words of a my co-worker “Knee buckling” 

If you have not had the pleasure of having this coffee run (don’t walk) to Portola to scoop some up. I also have plans to pick up one of Verve’s Geshas so be on the look out for that review!

Just picked up Don Pachi #Geisha @portolacoffeelab dry aroma is insane!

Just picked up Don Pachi #Geisha @portolacoffeelab dry aroma is insane!

Tags: geisha

mar-soupial:

Coffee Roasts:
22 °C (72 °F) Green Beans: Green coffee beans as they arrive at the dock. They can be stored for up to two years.
165 °C (329 °F) Drying Phase: As beans roast, they lose water and increase in size. Arabian coffee is prepared using beans roasted from between 165 °C (329 °F) and 210 °C (410 °F).
195 °C (383 °F) Cinnamon Roast: A very light roast level, immediately before first crack. Light brown, toasted grain flavors with sharp acidic tones, almost tea-like in character.
205 °C (401 °F) New England Roast: Moderate light brown, still acidic but not bready, a traditional roast for Northeastern U.S. Coffee, at first crack.
210 °C (410 °F) American Roast: Medium light brown, the traditional roast for the Eastern U.S. First crack ending.
220 °C (428 °F) City Roast: Medium brown, the norm for most of the U.S., good for tasting the varietal character of a bean.
225 °C (437 °F) Full City Roast: Medium dark brown with occasional oil sheen, good for varietal character and bittersweet flavors. At the beginning of second crack.
230 °C (446 °F) Vienna Roast: Moderate dark brown with light surface oil, more bittersweet, caramel-y flavor, acidity muted. In the middle of second crack. Occasionally used for espresso blends.
240 °C (464 °F) French Roast: Dark brown, shiny with oil, burnt undertones, acidity diminished. At the end of second crack. A popular roast for espresso blends.
245 °C (473 °F) Italian Roast: Very dark brown and shiny, burnt tones become more distinct, acidity almost gone, thin body. The common roast for espresso blends.
250 °C (482 °F) Spanish Roast: Extremely dark brown, nearly black and very shiny, charcoal and tar tones dominate, flat, with thin body.

Very Cool.

mar-soupial:

Coffee Roasts:

22 °C (72 °F) Green Beans: Green coffee beans as they arrive at the dock. They can be stored for up to two years.

165 °C (329 °F) Drying Phase: As beans roast, they lose water and increase in size. Arabian coffee is prepared using beans roasted from between 165 °C (329 °F) and 210 °C (410 °F).

195 °C (383 °F) Cinnamon Roast: A very light roast level, immediately before first crack. Light brown, toasted grain flavors with sharp acidic tones, almost tea-like in character.

205 °C (401 °F) New England Roast: Moderate light brown, still acidic but not bready, a traditional roast for Northeastern U.S. Coffee, at first crack.

210 °C (410 °F) American Roast: Medium light brown, the traditional roast for the Eastern U.S. First crack ending.

220 °C (428 °F) City Roast: Medium brown, the norm for most of the U.S., good for tasting the varietal character of a bean.

225 °C (437 °F) Full City Roast: Medium dark brown with occasional oil sheen, good for varietal character and bittersweet flavors. At the beginning of second crack.

230 °C (446 °F) Vienna Roast: Moderate dark brown with light surface oil, more bittersweet, caramel-y flavor, acidity muted. In the middle of second crack. Occasionally used for espresso blends.

240 °C (464 °F) French Roast: Dark brown, shiny with oil, burnt undertones, acidity diminished. At the end of second crack. A popular roast for espresso blends.

245 °C (473 °F) Italian Roast: Very dark brown and shiny, burnt tones become more distinct, acidity almost gone, thin body. The common roast for espresso blends.

250 °C (482 °F) Spanish Roast: Extremely dark brown, nearly black and very shiny, charcoal and tar tones dominate, flat, with thin body.

Very Cool.

(via seriousaboutcoffee)

Delirious over Los Delirios, Nicaragua. @intelligentsiacoffee effervescent, white grape, juicy, chocolate, caramel finish. #singleorigin #espresso

Delirious over Los Delirios, Nicaragua. @intelligentsiacoffee effervescent, white grape, juicy, chocolate, caramel finish. #singleorigin #espresso

Don’t forget to #vote #election

Don’t forget to #vote #election

Tags: vote election

And so…it begins. #gre #gradschool

And so…it begins. #gre #gradschool

Tags: gre gradschool

@vervecoffee Pulcal, Guatemala. Smooth Smoky, Marshmallow, Raspberry Fruit Tart. #singleorigin #coffee #vervecoffee

@vervecoffee Pulcal, Guatemala. Smooth Smoky, Marshmallow, Raspberry Fruit Tart. #singleorigin #coffee #vervecoffee

Don’t get me wrong. I enjoy #siphon #pourover and #aeropress a much as the next person but the #Frenchpress doesn’t get enough respect. #coffee @vervecoffee #vervecoffee

Don’t get me wrong. I enjoy #siphon #pourover and #aeropress a much as the next person but the #Frenchpress doesn’t get enough respect. #coffee @vervecoffee #vervecoffee

Getting my #grind on. #coffee #Frenchpress

Getting my #grind on. #coffee #Frenchpress

Watering some concrete. With any luck and a little bit of love, someday this slab will grow up to be a sidewalk.

Watering some concrete. With any luck and a little bit of love, someday this slab will grow up to be a sidewalk.

cyclivist:

oooh would I get one of these

I need this!

cyclivist:

oooh would I get one of these

I need this!

Coffee Origin// Guatemala
Region// Chimaltenango
Varietal// Bourbon, Typica, Caturra
Name// Patzun
Roaster// Portola Coffee Lab
Producer// ???
Elevation// 1600 - 1900 Meters
Process// Wet
Roast Date// ?.?.12
Brew Date// 10.12.12
Brew Method// Trifecta
Notes// 
I’m not sure why this coffee has three different varietals. Is it that they are three different varietals from the same lot? Or is it a single bean that had been crossed with three different varietals? Not sure, but I plan on investigating. 
I like drinking single origin coffee because it offers unique profiles that are it’s own. Single origins are fresh and offer something new each season. I’m usually not a fan of blends because I’m not looking for a static (or near static) flavor profile. I want to experience new and fresh flavors that come from one source. 
I’m not exactly sure how classify the Patzun, because not sure what the three different varietals mean. 
In any case, the Patzun is an interesting and transformative cup of coffee. Patzun begins with a medium smoky body, that it nicely balanced with a plum sweetness and a mildly tart green grape finish. Given the start of the cup I wouldn’t expect what came towards the end of cup. Patzun’s smokiness subsides and makes room for buttermilk. The buttermilk brings along with it a wonderful cream mouth-feel.  This mouth-feel disperses quickly, and lingers loosely after the cup is done. 
The Patzun transforms not only its flavor profile but its mouth-feel and body. 

Coffee Origin// Guatemala

Region// Chimaltenango

Varietal// Bourbon, Typica, Caturra

Name// Patzun

Roaster// Portola Coffee Lab

Producer// ???

Elevation// 1600 - 1900 Meters

Process// Wet

Roast Date// ?.?.12

Brew Date// 10.12.12

Brew Method// Trifecta

Notes//

I’m not sure why this coffee has three different varietals. Is it that they are three different varietals from the same lot? Or is it a single bean that had been crossed with three different varietals? Not sure, but I plan on investigating.

I like drinking single origin coffee because it offers unique profiles that are it’s own. Single origins are fresh and offer something new each season. I’m usually not a fan of blends because I’m not looking for a static (or near static) flavor profile. I want to experience new and fresh flavors that come from one source.

I’m not exactly sure how classify the Patzun, because not sure what the three different varietals mean.

In any case, the Patzun is an interesting and transformative cup of coffee. Patzun begins with a medium smoky body, that it nicely balanced with a plum sweetness and a mildly tart green grape finish. Given the start of the cup I wouldn’t expect what came towards the end of cup. Patzun’s smokiness subsides and makes room for buttermilk. The buttermilk brings along with it a wonderful cream mouth-feel.  This mouth-feel disperses quickly, and lingers loosely after the cup is done. 

The Patzun transforms not only its flavor profile but its mouth-feel and body.